Articles

Articles

bharat ias -  Revisiting a passage from India

 Revisiting a passage from India

Context The challenge before India lies in the way it taps its widespread disapora’sfinancial and intellectual capital. For this it needs to adopt a wise, pro-active, secular, non-jingoistic tone. Issue: Leveraging the widespread Indian diaspora  PravasiBhartiyaDiwas 9thJanuary is celebrated as PravasiBhartiya Divas every year in India Occasion: On this day in 1915, Gandhiji returned from South Africa , after refining Satyagraha, or peaceful protest, against the colonial and racist regime there Challenging circumstances Indians in GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) countries, ranging from skilled and unskilled workers to those holding executive jobs or running businesses, may have to face more challenging circumstances of economic slowdown. Why, a slowdown? Shale oil revolution: The shale oil revolution in the United States combined with slower global growth and environmental concerns has already pushed the world into a post-OPEC &perennial low oil prices phase Instability: The entire region to the west of India up to the Mediterranean is now swept by Shia-Sunni contestation and the challenge posed by radical Islam. Thus instability may persist for decades Policy failure successive governments have failed to upgrade skills of Indian workers going to West Asia  A blow to prestige As a rising power, India’s prestige suffers when its citizens are seen doing menial jobs. Moreover Indian strategic options get limited fearing reprisal against workers. That is why for decades India has let its citizens be subjected to local labour rules that are medieval and regressive, such as employer seizing the travel documents of the worker on arrival  Diaspora in the U.S., the United Kingdom and Canada with rising numbers and greater earnings, the diaspora in US, UK and Canada are becoming more proactive to rally in support of Indian interests Numbers: U.S. leads as the country with the highest number of Indian origin persons numbering around four million, the U.K. and Canada are next with 1.45 million and 1.2 million, respectively. Sikhs in Canada Sikhs are the largest component of the diaspora in Canada, at 34 per cent compared to 27 per cent Hindus, with the rest being Muslims and Christians. Sikhs are at the number two spot in the U.K and the U.S. An Estimate The Wall Street Journal estimates that there are 15.6 million persons born in India living abroad. This number has grown by 17.2 per cent since 2010 Conclusion  India should tap into the intellectual capital that Indian diaspora has to offer  ...

Publishes on : 16-Jan-2017 12:33 PM
View Article
bharat ias - Keeping the streets safe

Keeping the streets safe

  Context There is the other factor of inadequacies of police leadership that have become glaring over the years Issue: Recent molestation incident in Bengaluru on New Year’s Eve & consequent apathy displayed by Bengaluru police in tackling the entire situation What could have been done? The local police stations could have possibly made an assessment late in the afternoon so that extra policemen could have been directed to localities where the crowds were pouring in. There was therefore an element of failure on the part of city police intelligence What should be done? Restructuring existing police arrangements: what is required now is to restructure existing police arrangements for special occasions such as New Year celebrations  Why police didn’t use force against anti-social elements? police were reluctant to use force against anti-social elements. Reasons could be, A long chain of command: Unless specific orders are given from the commissioner itself, cops shy of using strong methods Reason: The cause for above state of affairs is the host of judicial enquiries and complaints against police. Even if government uses force, the opposition makes an issue out of it, in spite of the fact that the ground situation warranted such an action Leadership deficit A weak leadership : the police looks up to Chief minister or Home minister of a state for even routine field decisions. Even if there is a CM who stays away from field affairs, a weak DGP or Police Commissioner takes no chances. Granting more autonomy to police is futile in the presence of such hesitant DGPs suggestions Public pressure: it is only strong public opinion that can bring a sea change to the styles of policing. In the Bengaluru incidents, the citizenry has a significant role to play by bringing enough pressure on the government to identify the accused and bring them to book. If they do not rise to the occasion, not much will happen. Sensitizing the police: Day-to-day interaction on the subject between the higher echelons and policemen at the grass-roots level will help. Senior police officers need to visit stations and talk to the constabulary who actually are at the ground level when unruly incidents happen.     ...

Publishes on : 14-Jan-2017 04:30 PM
View Article
bharat ias - SC asked Govt to resolve conflict over ‘rape’ definition in two laws

SC asked Govt to resolve conflict over ‘rape’ definition in two laws

Context An exception to Section 375 (rape) in the IPC allows a man to go scot-free despite having sex with his 15-year-old ‘wife’. Backdrop In a petition before a Bench led by Chief Justice of India J.S. Khehar, the BachpanBachaoAndolan, an organisation run by Nobel Laureate KailashSatyarthi, said an estimated 47 per cent of children in India were married off before they turned 18, according to the United Nations. It further said that, IPC condones rape: The IPC condones the rape of a 15-year-old by her husband despite the fact that the more recent Protection of Children from Sexual Offences Act (POCSO) of 2012 qualifies those aged below 18 as ‘children’  Penal provisions in POCSO POCSO has specific penal provisions against ‘penetrative sexual assault’ and ‘aggressive penetrative sexual assault’ on children below 18. Section 6 of the Act enunciates the punishment for aggravated penetrative sexual assault as rigorous imprisonment of not less than 10 years to life imprisonment. Mr. Satyarthi wants the apex court to clear the anomaly in law. The IPC terms children as those aged under 15 years while POCSO terms children as those aged under 18. The Chink Despite being a child by definition (under the age of 18), provisions of POCSO are not applied. Reason: The benefit of a Special Act (POCSO) is not afforded to children when they are in married relationship but over the age of 15. Therefore, a child’s status as a child till she attains the age of 18 is denied to her once she is forcefully or otherwise wed. Simple explanation Problem with POCSO: Under POCSO, children under age of 18 years are protected but if a child is wed or forcefully married then provisions of POCSO do not apply. Problem with IPC: Under IPC, anyone of 15 years of age or above 15 years of age is not deemed to be a child. Why this petition? Penal provisions for child rape are stricter. Hence, the petitioner wants the provision under IPC to be amended and age be increased to 18 years of age. Directions by the SC The apex court directed the government to address the issue within four months. The Bench asked Mr. Satyarthi to approach the court on the same grounds for immediate resolution if he is not satisfied with the government’s response.    ...

Publishes on : 14-Jan-2017 04:27 PM
View Article
bharat ias - An unfortunate legacy

An unfortunate legacy

  Context The colonial category of “criminal tribes” may have been “denotified” but many communities remain unclassified   What was the Criminal Tribes Act (CTA)? The term Criminal Tribes Act (CTA) refers to various pieces of legislation enforced in India during British rule; §  The first was the Criminal Tribes Act, 1871. It was applied mostly in North India. The Act was extended to Bengal Presidency and other areas in 1876, and, finally, with the Criminal Tribes Act, 1911, it was extended to Madras Presidency as well. The Act went through several amendments in the next decade and, finally, the Criminal Tribes Act, 1924 incorporated all of them Enquiry committees subsequently after India’s independence, there were some enquiry committees which looked at the way the CTA had worked throughout India §  Region-specific inquiry committees: Bombay (1939), United Provinces (Agra and Oudh, 1947) §  The AnanthsayanamAyyangar Committee (1949-50) report was more comprehensive: It had a list of 116 criminal tribes in British territories and more than 200 in the Princely States Ayyangar committee §  Repeal of CTA: The recommendations of this committee led to repeal of CTA in August 1952 §  Replace CTA by a central legislation: The Ayyangar Committee also recommended that, “The Criminal Tribes Act, 1924, should be replaced by a Central legislation applicable to all habitual offenders without any distinction based on caste, creed or birth.”  Report of UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on India InMarch 2007, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination did a report on India and stated, “The Committee is concerned that the so-called denotified and nomadic tribes, which were listed for their alleged “criminal tendencies” under the former Criminal Tribes Act (1871), continue to be stigmatised under the Habitual Offenders Act (1952). (art. 2 (1) (c)). The Committee recommends that the State party repeal the Habitual Offenders Act and effectively rehabilitate the denotified and nomadic tribes concerned.”  NCNDT report In 2008, the National Commission for Denotified, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes (NCDNT) produced a report. In continuation of a discussion on CTA repeal, it added, “But, to keep effective control over the so-called hardened criminals, the Habitual Offenders Act was placed in the statute book.” Thus, the provisions were meant to be similar to the CTA, but identification shifted to the individual, rather than the collective category Concurrent list Entry 15 in the Concurrent List (seventh schedule) mentions “vagrancy; nomadic and migratory tribes” implying that both state and centre can legislate on it but contrary to popular perception there never was a Union-level law or statute on this issue. Central government, after CTA repeal, had prepared a model bill. States used this as a template for creating state-level laws on habitual offenders. §  The earliest is Punjab/Haryana (1918), followed by Madras/Tamil Nadu (1948). Others followed in 1950s/1960s. 2016 Report of NCDNT A quote from a 2016 Report of the NCDNT sums it up:  Classification “After Independence, the erstwhile aborigines were classified as scheduled tribes, the untouchables were classified as scheduled castes and others included in the backward classes. Although, many of the denotified, nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes are spread among SC/ST/OBC, many are still not classified anywhere and have no access to socio-economic benefits, whether education, health, housing or otherwise… Except a few states like Maharashtra, Gujarat, etc, some of these communities figure in various classifications in the states such as Backward Tribe (Puducherry), Most Backward Classes (Tamil Nadu), Extremely Backward Classes (Bihar), “original settlers” in Arunachal Pradesh, Primitive Tribes (Jharkhand/ Odisha), Hill Tribes (Assam) etc. In some states they are called “tribal settlers”. In some states they are called “hidden tribes” etc… There are many anomalies in terms of identification of these communities, from state to state.  Creation of a district level Grievance redressal committee “Many people also do not know what a denotified tribe is and which authority is looking after their grievances. Recently, this Commission made a recommendation to the Government of India to write to all state governments to form a district-level Grievances Redressal Committee under the District Collector to hear the grievances of these communities/groups/tribes.”  Number game “These communities/tribes account for nearly 10 per cent of community’s population as has been mentioned in some writings and there are nearly 820 communities and tribes in India, although some of the community leaders assess that their number would be more with 198 denotified tribes and nearly 1,500 nomadic tribes and their population may be even more than 10 per cent.”  This is partly a positive affirmation/ reservation issue. But if one goes through the annexures in the 2016 NCDNT report, some communities want to be recognised as SCs, STs or OBCs. But there are also those who want recognition as DNTs/NTs.    ...

Publishes on : 12-Jan-2017 10:54 AM
View Article
bharat ias - An unfortunate legacy

An unfortunate legacy

  Context The colonial category of “criminal tribes” may have been “denotified” but many communities remain unclassified   What was the Criminal Tribes Act (CTA)? The term Criminal Tribes Act (CTA) refers to various pieces of legislation enforced in India during British rule; §  The first was the Criminal Tribes Act, 1871. It was applied mostly in North India. The Act was extended to Bengal Presidency and other areas in 1876, and, finally, with the Criminal Tribes Act, 1911, it was extended to Madras Presidency as well. The Act went through several amendments in the next decade and, finally, the Criminal Tribes Act, 1924 incorporated all of them Enquiry committees subsequently after India’s independence, there were some enquiry committees which looked at the way the CTA had worked throughout India §  Region-specific inquiry committees: Bombay (1939), United Provinces (Agra and Oudh, 1947) §  The AnanthsayanamAyyangar Committee (1949-50) report was more comprehensive: It had a list of 116 criminal tribes in British territories and more than 200 in the Princely States Ayyangar committee §  Repeal of CTA: The recommendations of this committee led to repeal of CTA in August 1952 §  Replace CTA by a central legislation: The Ayyangar Committee also recommended that, “The Criminal Tribes Act, 1924, should be replaced by a Central legislation applicable to all habitual offenders without any distinction based on caste, creed or birth.”  Report of UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on India InMarch 2007, the UN Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination did a report on India and stated, “The Committee is concerned that the so-called denotified and nomadic tribes, which were listed for their alleged “criminal tendencies” under the former Criminal Tribes Act (1871), continue to be stigmatised under the Habitual Offenders Act (1952). (art. 2 (1) (c)). The Committee recommends that the State party repeal the Habitual Offenders Act and effectively rehabilitate the denotified and nomadic tribes concerned.”  NCNDT report In 2008, the National Commission for Denotified, Nomadic and Semi-Nomadic Tribes (NCDNT) produced a report. In continuation of a discussion on CTA repeal, it added, “But, to keep effective control over the so-called hardened criminals, the Habitual Offenders Act was placed in the statute book.” Thus, the provisions were meant to be similar to the CTA, but identification shifted to the individual, rather than the collective category Concurrent list Entry 15 in the Concurrent List (seventh schedule) mentions “vagrancy; nomadic and migratory tribes” implying that both state and centre can legislate on it but contrary to popular perception there never was a Union-level law or statute on this issue. Central government, after CTA repeal, had prepared a model bill. States used this as a template for creating state-level laws on habitual offenders. §  The earliest is Punjab/Haryana (1918), followed by Madras/Tamil Nadu (1948). Others followed in 1950s/1960s. 2016 Report of NCDNT A quote from a 2016 Report of the NCDNT sums it up:  Classification “After Independence, the erstwhile aborigines were classified as scheduled tribes, the untouchables were classified as scheduled castes and others included in the backward classes. Although, many of the denotified, nomadic and semi-nomadic tribes are spread among SC/ST/OBC, many are still not classified anywhere and have no access to socio-economic benefits, whether education, health, housing or otherwise… Except a few states like Maharashtra, Gujarat, etc, some of these communities figure in various classifications in the states such as Backward Tribe (Puducherry), Most Backward Classes (Tamil Nadu), Extremely Backward Classes (Bihar), “original settlers” in Arunachal Pradesh, Primitive Tribes (Jharkhand/ Odisha), Hill Tribes (Assam) etc. In some states they are called “tribal settlers”. In some states they are called “hidden tribes” etc… There are many anomalies in terms of identification of these communities, from state to state.  Creation of a district level Grievance redressal committee “Many people also do not know what a denotified tribe is and which authority is looking after their grievances. Recently, this Commission made a recommendation to the Government of India to write to all state governments to form a district-level Grievances Redressal Committee under the District Collector to hear the grievances of these communities/groups/tribes.”  Number game “These communities/tribes account for nearly 10 per cent of community’s population as has been mentioned in some writings and there are nearly 820 communities and tribes in India, although some of the community leaders assess that their number would be more with 198 denotified tribes and nearly 1,500 nomadic tribes and their population may be even more than 10 per cent.”  This is partly a positive affirmation/ reservation issue. But if one goes through the annexures in the 2016 NCDNT report, some communities want to be recognised as SCs, STs or OBCs. But there are also those who want recognition as DNTs/NTs.    ...

Publishes on : 12-Jan-2017 10:54 AM
View Article
best ias coacning in rt nagar, best ias coaching in hebbal, ias coaching rajajinagar, banking coaching in jayanagar, banking coaching in marathahalli, top ias training centers in rt nagar and hebbal, ibps coaching centers in rt nagar, ias training center in hebbal, best ias exam training in hebbal, upsc exam training center in hebbal, ias training center in bangalore hebbal rt nagar, Bharat ias & kas coaching institute provides the best coaching (training) for kas foundation examination in Bangalore with RT nagar branch, jayanagar branch, marathahalli branch, rajajinagar branch, in hebbal, in rt nagar. we also provide coaching classes for IAs, IBPS, SSC, PSI etc. bharat ias is one of the best training center in bangalore for competative exams coaching with best results. we prepare you for kpsc exams with well experienced faculty in RT Nagar and Hebbal, upsc exam pretaration training centers in bangalore, top ias training centers in bengaluru karnataka.